Author: Jessica Kay Murray

Different types of fancy dress and other pages from the Language of Fashion

This entry is part 12 of 21 in the series The Language of Fashion - 1939 Fashion Dictionary

Here are 12 more scans from The Language of Fashion, a fashion dictionary published in 1939. I found the “different types of fancy dress” most interesting in these pages, and funny that it includes a Disney drawing of a dwarf (from Snow White) to illustrate and define a Dwarf Costume.

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Different types of Coats illustrated – from The Language of Fashion

This entry is part 15 of 21 in the series The Language of Fashion - 1939 Fashion Dictionary

Different types of coats, illustrated and defined. These include the Box Coat of the 1930s, the Blouse coat of the 1920s, coachmens’ coats, 17th century buffcoat, coolie coat, Balmacaan, Duster early 1900s, Raglan coat, Women’s Cutaway Coat, MacFarlane, and more types of coats.

These pages also cover different types of coifs and collars, including the Bertha collar of the 1920s, the Chin Collar of 1916, and the Buster Brown collar.

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The Language of Fashion: Dictionary scans aal through blotch

This entry is part 21 of 21 in the series The Language of Fashion - 1939 Fashion Dictionary

Here we go! I plan on scanning and posting this whole fashion dictionary, The Language of Fashion by Mary Brooks Picken (published in 1939). If you’d like the full rez scans, they will be available for a reasonable price, when I finish. So far, only about 200 more pages to go 🙂

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Fashion Pronunciation Key, Preface, and Table of Contents

This entry is part 19 of 21 in the series The Language of Fashion - 1939 Fashion Dictionary

There is the preface and table of contents from The Language of Fashion. The preface contains a pronunciation key, old fashion words vs new fashion words, a note about how color is described in the book (since it was just published in black and white), as well as a paragraph about the use of trademarks.

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The Language of Fashion by Mary Brooks Picken 1938

This entry is part 20 of 21 in the series The Language of Fashion - 1939 Fashion Dictionary

I am so excited to get The Language of Fashion by Mary Brooks Picken (1938 edition) as an early Christmas present! I am even more thrilled by my friend’s thoughtfulness. Even more excited that this book’s copyright has apparently expired (according to my search on the U.S. government copyright site)…. so I can scan the pages!

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Advertisements and back pages from The Modern Priscilla July 1913

This entry is part 2 of 14 in the series The Modern Priscilla - July 1913

Here are the final pages of the July 1913 issue of The Modern Priscilla. It wraps up and concludes the fashion and cooking articles, as well as shorter articles, including the Priscilla Juniors section and article about Summer Food for Children. These last pages are also chock full of ads for interesting things

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Maternity Corset Ads and Cooking Ideas

This entry is part 1 of 14 in the series The Modern Priscilla - July 1913

Honestly, the best thing about these pages are the advertisements. These pages contained a small ad for maternity corsets, which I found particularly interesting.

Also advertised were canned sardines, The Alaska Freezer, Jello, Coffee Jelly, Maternity Apparel, Karo Syrup, Hair Dye, and a variety of “Make Money from Home” ads.

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Early 1900s advertisements and housekeeping advice

This entry is part 8 of 14 in the series The Modern Priscilla - July 1913

These next few pages are a miscellany of advertisements and pithy articles. Another adjustable dress form advertisement, perfume advertisement, Blue-jay corn plasters ad, an advertisement for The AlbeMarle-Hoffman Hotel overlooking Madison Square in NYC (“a good room at $1.50 per day, and a good room with a bath for $2 per day “- imagine paying that in NYC nowadays!).

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Early 1900s Summer Fashion Illustrations

This entry is part 14 of 14 in the series The Modern Priscilla - July 1913

These fashion illustrations show what women wore in 1913, and what was in style. Apparently, embroideries were the rule, and placed where there was the smallest excuse for them. This illustration shows three fashionable early 1900s women and a little girl. On the right side is an advertisement for a Venus adjustable dress form. The text includes detailed descriptions and how to order the dress patterns to make the fashions the models illustrated are wearing.

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