Old Book Scans

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The Language of Fashion by Mary Brooks Picken 1938

I am so excited to get The Language of Fashion by Mary Brooks Picken (1938 edition) as an early Christmas present! I am even more thrilled by my friend's thoughtfulness. Even more excited that this book's copyright has apparently expired (according to my search on the U.S. government copyright site).... so I can scan the pages!

Old Photo Scans

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Cabinet Cards of Young Men, Children, and Couples

Here are the rest of the 1800s cabinet cards I digitized for the Carondelet Historical Society. I really like the young lady wearing a hat, as shot by Polensky of Milwaukee Ave., Chicago. That photo, of any, gives me some ideas on historical re-creation. The background is so cool, and could probably be made into a photoshop texture or something!

Popular Songs Magazine: October 1935

This entry is part 2 of 1 in the series Popular Songs Magazine: October 1935

Ginger Rogers graced the front cover of the October 1935 edition of Popular Songs Magazine. It advertised the lyrics to over 30 popular songs of the mid-1930s!

On the inner cover was a full page illustrated advertisement for diamond engagement rings, wedding rings, watches, and other jewelry for men and women wanting great values by Royal Diamond and Watch of 170 Broadway, NYC. You could could get a diamond engagement and wedding ring set for only $29.75 (approximately $525.12 in 2016 dollars).

The Perfolastic shapewear had a money back guarantee if it did not reduce your waist and hips by 3 inches, and an offer to send a free sample of the perforated elastic material that the girdles were made from. This illustrates the ideal 1930s silhouette of narrow waist and hips, with a small to medium bust.

On the Table of Contents page was a sidebar ad for Maybelline eye shadow and mascara. “Some are born beautiful, others acquire beauty. If you are not a natural beauty, then the most natural thing in the world is to acquire beauty. Encourage yourself!” … the advertisement begins…

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1960s Parnes Feinstein Black Dress with attached belt – small – medium

This is such a classic early 1960s sheath dress!
It comes with the belt sewn on, and appears to buckle on the side. It zips up the back with a metal zipper.
Some dust from being stored all wadded up, and the belt could definitely use an ironing! No holes or major flaws that I found, this dress is in excellent wearable vintage condition.
It’s batwinged, so no clear shoulders- I’ve just measured where they seem to fall.
This dress is fully lined and appears to be a heavier synthetic fabric.

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1880s going away dress outside

This entry is part of 22 in the series Carondelet Historical Society Project

Once I had the model in this 1880s bustle dress, I didn’t want to let her out! The weather was SO pretty outside that we decided to go take some fashion photos at Carondelet Park. The boathouse at Carondelet Park, although originally built in 1918, and the concrete pergolas (built in the 1930s), made for perfect a perfect set to go with this 150+ year old dress.

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Pinups on billboards, book covers, and record covers.

This entry is part 11 of 32 in the series CheeseCake Pinup Magazine - 1953

Here’s an interesting history of pinups in advertising! Showing pictures of billboards from the 1800s-1950s, with a focus on pretty girls in beer advertisements.

The next page shows samples of pretty women used to advertise books and, the latest thing, record album covers. Even classical music “moves off the shelves” faster when an attractive woman is pictured on it!

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Pretty Girls Sold Tobacco – old cigarette and tobacco ads

This entry is part 9 of 32 in the series CheeseCake Pinup Magazine - 1953

Here is an interesting history of tobacco advertisements using pretty women and pinups as bait, and to gain broader social acceptance of smoking cigarettes! To explain changes in tobacco advertising, you have to take a historical perspective, which this article explains best. Briefly the history of tobacco ads (according to this 1953 article):

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